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Full text of "Wellesley news"

Vol. 4. No. 22. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1905. 



Price, 5 Cents 




BAY, LAKE t.L( 



SILVER BAY. 

For those who are deciding whether to 
go to Silver Bay this summer or not, the 
following retrospect of last summer's con- 
vention may be of interest. 

Only two of us started out from Welles- 
ley on the Friday morning train for Alba- 
ny, for most of the Silver Bay pilgrims 
were already there. Other late comers 
gradually collected as the morning wore 
on, so that by the time we had passed 
through the beautiful Bcrkshires and 
drew into Albany at noon, there was a 
goodly number of us. We had just time 
for sandwiches and coffee there before 
we were off again on our way to Lake 
George. Somehow we all managed to 
get acquainted without much difficulty; 
for one of the Smith girls was sure that 
she had met one of our number last year, 
and the Holyoke girls thought it very 
probable that one of them might happen 
to know one of us, and if they were mis- 
taken, why it was only anticipating mat- 
ters a bit, so what was the difference? 
Long before Lake George came in view, 
we had all found mutual friends or mutual 
ideas, or at least a mutual purpose in 
coming to Silver Bay, and were all good 
friends, for all college girls have much in 
common. 



The last few miles of the way we hud- 
dled around the windows, each trying to 
get a first view of the lake. The country 
grew more and more hilly; great rocks 
and thick pine groves grew more frequent, 
and then the train swept around a final 
curve and there was Lake George. 

The twenty-five mile ride up the lake 
was pure joy. The sun was well toward 
the west when we boarded the big lake 
steamer, and we watched it sink lower 
and lower over the hills as we cut through 
the green water, leaving mile after mile 
behind us. Past hotels, fine cottages and 
rustic camps we went At times the nar- 
row lake closed in so that there seemed 
no outlet, but always a hidden channel 
opened up. The sunlight on the mountains 
grew gold. the. shadows of the tall pines 
and birches lengthened, and then we 
passed behind an island and there was 
only the glow in the sky left and the 
waters were no longer blue and green, 
but dark gray. At dusk, around the last 
point we swept and the first stars shorie 
out as we turned into Silver Bay. 

They were all at the pier to meet us, 
hundreds of them, all smiling and welcom- 
ing and cheering and singing. Familiar 
faces appeared, our suit cases were seized, 
and we hurried up to the hotel to supper. 
"We are to have Overlook with Smith!" 



everyone was joyously calling, and when 
we saw it we were joyful too. It was a 
very long, very low log building high on 
the hillside, looking right over the hotel 
roof to the big, quiet mountains across 
the lake. The first meeting came that 
night, and, though every one who was 
tired stayed at home, the big hall was 
crowded and the cottage showed few 
lights. How everybody sang! and hew 
happy sounded that great voice of the 
convention! 

We all strolled back arm in arm to 
Overlook, and just before we went to bed 
we sat in a circle on the long verandah 
and talked things over. Perhaps it was 
the calm of the cool, sweet air and 1he 
moonlight across the water; perhaps the 
quiet strength of the mountains all about 
us, or perhaps it was iust the atmosphere 
of Silver Bay that did it. but somehow 
everything seemed simple and straight- 
forward that night. It seemed natural to 
be talking our problems over together, 
and a new and lasting comradeship came 
into being as we talked. We left Silver 
Bav after ten of those bedtime talks out 
under the stars, with a feeling that we 
had grown stronger and our problems 
weaker. And it is a feeling that does not 
go, but comes again all through the vear 
at the memory of those nights. That 
was the atmosphere which we carried 
away with us. the calm, the quiet strength 
and clear-seeing which tries and fails and 
tries again. 

I wish I could tell in detail about the 
meetings. The last word of advice given 
to us before we left was, " Don't trv to 
go to all the meetings." But what could 
one leave out? There were fewer meet- 
ings than usual last summer. They came 
only in the morning and evening. In the 
afternoons we read and talked and studied, 
had interviews with the leader and olaved. 
In short we did just what we liked, and 
the meetings were above all things prac- 
tical The normal school mission studv 
classes came first. In these we took a 
sample country and learned different 
methods of teaching mission studv classes, 
incidentally gleaning information about 
the country. Then came the alumna? and 
student meetings. We learned the differ- 
ent schemes of different colleges for ac- 
complishing the work of the different 
Christian Association Committees, taking 
one or two committees a day. These 
meetings were too interesting to think of 
omitting. Then we had a choice of va- 
rious Bible study classes. The amount of 
ground covered in ten days' time in each 
course was wonderful, hut particularly so 
in the Bible classes. We ended the course 
(Concluded on Page 2.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 

PRESS OF N. A. LlNOSEY & CO., BOSTON. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents a 
year to resident subscribers ; $1.00 per year to non- 
resident subscribers. _ . 

\11 advertising communications should be sent to 
Miss C. W. Rogers. Wellesley Inn Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
HELEN R. NORTON, Business Manager Collece 
N p ws 

All subscriptions should be sent to Elizabeth 

Camp. 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Jessie Gidley, 1906 

Associate Editor, Sadie M. Samuel, 1906 

Literary Editors, 

Winifred Hawkridge. 1906 Mary Lee Cadwell, 1906 

Marie Warren. 1907 

AldmnjE Editor, Roxnna H. Vivian, 1894 

Managing Editors, 

Helen R. Norton. 1905 Elizabeth Camp, 1905 

J. Gertrude Francis. 1906 



H. W. Cook S. Co. 
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1903. at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 



Spring housecleaning has attacked 
ley in a particularly thorough form. 
With the dusting of bird glasses and 
the reappearance of "spring fever," the 
garrel has been overhauled for old consti- 
tutions which have fallen behind the 
fashions, and brushing away of moth- 
eaten sections and general furbishing of 
by-laws has been begun. It is a good thing 
to have all our machinery in working or- 
der, and nothing is a greater hindrance to 
progression than rules which no longer 
have significance or effect. 

It is a sensible girl who saves herself. 
during the spring term and refuses to allow 
herself to be drawn into the many interests 
which claim the attention at present. 
We are coming to our most delightful 
term and to our busiest term as well, and 
tired as we arc with the winter and the 
midyear work, we shall be taking the pari 
of wisdom if we get a little more delight 
and a little less business from the three 
months and a half remaining frcm this 
year. It is a course not so selfish as it 
would seem, for are jaded, neurasthenic 
wrecks, no matter how skilled in matters 
executive, the best of advertisements for 
an Alma Mater which promises in its cir- 
cular to pay special attention to the health 
of the students? 



LEGENDA ELECTONS. 

At a meeting of the class of 1906 held 
March 17. the following were elected to 
serve on the Legenda Board: 

Editor-in-chief, Sadie M. Samuel. 

Associate Editor, Winifred Hawkridge. 

Litcrarv Editors, Alice MacQueen, El- 
eanor Stimson, Olive Gilbreath, Olive 
Green. 

Art Editor-in-chief, Ella MacKinnon. 

Art Editors, Elizabeth Connor, Perlee 
Bouton, Florence Herold. 



NOTICE. 

All copy for College News should be in 
the editors' hands by Friday noon of each 
week. Copy that is not ready until Friday 
morning should be brought to the News 
Office on the fifth floor and not sent 
through the resident mail. Address gen- 
eral correspondence to Jessie Gidley, 
Eliot; Alumnae notes to Miss Vivian, 
College Hall; College notes to Sadie Sam- 
uel, Freeman; Athletic. Literary and So- 
ciety notes to Winifred Hawkridge, Stone; 
Free Press to Mary Lee Cad well. Wood; 
Parliament of Fools to Marie Warren, 
Fiske. 



(Continued from Page 1.) 

SILVER BAY. 

with a comprehensive view of the whole 
subject given in so enthusiastic a way 
that we could not resist the determination 
to do daily Bible study by ourselves. 
The last meeting of the morning was a 
missionary meeting. These dealt with 
home as well as foreign missions. We 
heard about the George Junior Republic 
and the various movements in behalf of 
our working girls and of many other in- 
teresting organizations of our own land. 

After lunch we went off on long explor- 
ing expeditions in row-boats. We went 
in swimming, we played tennis and climbed 
the mountains. In the evening we sang 
college songs on the pier in the twilight 
until the evening meetings began 

We all know the inspiration of listening 
to Mr. Mott and Mr. Speer, for we have 
often listened to them here at college. 
We shall always remember, too. how 
happy we were in having Miss Hazard 
with us at Silver Bay over Sunday. The 
real joys of Silver Bay, the lasting inspira- 
tion we found there, the deeper knowledge 
of ourselves and our fellows, and above 
all the peace and strength of simple, happy 
living, can never get to he old stories to 
us, but must always remain fresh and 
true and lasting, while we remember 
Silver Bay. L. M. B., 1906. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

March 22, 4.20 P.M., in Houghton Memorial Chapel, organ re- 
cital by Mr. B. L. Whelpley, organist of the Cecilia Society, 
Boston. 

March 25, 1.30 P.M., in Lecture Room K, lecture by Mr. Robert 
A vv'oods. Subject: "Education for the Children of the 
Poor." jA 

March 26, 11 A.M., services in Houghton •Memorial Chapel, 
sermon by Professor Bosworth of Oberlin College. 7 
P.M.. lenten vespers. 

March 27, 10 A.M., in Gymnasium, Indoor Meet. 

March 27, 3 to 6, P.M., at the Barn, Shakespeare Masquerade. 

March 27, 7.30 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, Artists' Concert, 
Kneisel quartette. 

March 28, 4.15 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, lecture by Mr. Sam- 
uel A. King. Subject: "Enunciation and Pronunciation." 

March 29, 4.20 P.M., in Houghton Memorial Chapel, Lenten 
organ recital. 

COLL EGE N OTES. 

Misses Poynter and Guion entertained the Southern Club, 
Tuesday evening, March 7. 

Thursday evening, March 9th, a number of Freshmen gave 
"The Cleptomaniac " before the members of the Denison House 
Neighborhood Party in Boston The play was very attractively 
presented, full of funny situations and clever acting, so that the 
audience was kept laughing most of the evening. Dorothea 
Lockwood was in charge of the performance. Those who took 
part were: Margaret Jones, Teneriffe Temple, Frida Semler, 
Mary Louise Dodsworth, Helen Cooper, Christina Gurlitz and 
Adele Gray. 

The Freshman Class held a social at the Barn, Monday after- 
noon, March 13. 

The Scribblers' Club met Thursday evening / March 16, at the 
Tau Zeta Epsilon House. Miss Haulenbeck and Miss Hibbard 
read. 

The Senior Class held a social at the Phi Sigma House, Thurs- 
day afternoon March 16. 

Miss Doak and Miss Nye, 1904, visited the College last week. 

All those interested in the work of the College Settlement 
Association will be particularly glad to hear that the lectures 
by Mr. Woods of South End House, Boston, are open to them. 
Mr. Wood's next lecture will be given on Saturday afternoon, 
March 25. The subject for this lecture is: "Education for 
the Children of the Poor." After the spring recess Mr. Woods 
will continue these lectures on April 15, May 6 and May 27. 

The conference of the Young VV omen's Christian Association 
will open its student session at Silver Bay this year on June 23d 
and will continue until July 4th. The entire expense for the 
conference, including board, lecture fee, and railroad fare from 
Wellesley to Silver Bay, and back to Albany will amount to $25. 
Any further information concerning the conference will gladly be 
given by Florence P. Plummer, chairman of the Silver Bay Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Filene lectured in the Faculty Parlor, Friday evening, 
March 17. He spoke on the "Relation Between Employer a 
Employed. " 

Following is a list of the officers of Consumers' League for the 
following year : 

President Elizabeth Moore 

Secretary and Treasurer Marie Carson 

Executive Committee, Faculty Member Miss Calkins 

1905 Member Miss Hilda Tufts 

1906 Member Miss Helen Baird 

1907 Member Miss Annie Crawford 

1908 Member Miss B. Andrews 

It will be of interest to quote from a review by Professor Dick- 
son of London, in a recent number of the English scientific period- 
ical, "Nature," which is a comparison of two newly-published 
investigations, one, "Fecundation of Plants" by the Botanist 
Mottier; the other, "Contributions to the Life-History of Pinus" 
by Prof. Margaret C. Ferguson. The review technically dis- 
cusses the papers, particularly the latter, in its departure from 
old conclusions, as formative contributions to cytology. In 
closing Professor Dickson says: "All cytologists are indebted 
to the author for her beautiful drawings, which are reproduced 
in a series of twenty-four plates. There is no doubt that the 
publication of these two memoirs, the one by the Carnegie In- 
stitution, and the other by the Washington Academy of Sciences, 
will be of much service to those engaged in cytological research. " 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



READING FOR OLD SOLDIERS. 

I quote the following passages from a letter written on the 
Ides of March, of this year, by the Hon. W. P. Brownlow, Mana- 
ger National Soldiers home at Johnson City, Washington County, 
Tennessee : 

"Congress has, at various times, appropriated an aggregate of 
$2,000,000 for the construction of a rvational Soldiers home at 
Johnson City, Tenn. This plant has been under construction 
tor three years and is now complete. The management began 
the admission ot members about a year ago and to-day there are 
1,000 inmates, and by May lirst, there win be 2,000. The home, 
when tuM, win contain a population of 4,500 disabled volunteer 
soldiers if the United States, who by reason ol disease and age 
are unable to earn a living by manual labor. 

"Congress does not provide either a library or books for these 
Homes, nine of which now exist in the Lnited States; but the 
Libraries have been tilled by books donated by patriotic citizens 
throughout the country. Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave me $25,- 
000 to construct a library building at this home. The library 
building is now complete and without books, and has ample 
room lor io.ooo volumes." 

Colonel Brownlow asks for the donation of a few books, saying 
that he can use ail kinds "as the membership of the Home con- 
sists ol men who are graduates ol the best coneges of the country 
as well as those who can scarcely read. " It is evident, however, 
that paper-bound books would not be appropriate, nor any ot 
shabby covers and flimsy contents, riistories, biographies, 
poems, novels, collections 01 short stories, books ot science, popu- 
lar or unpopular, essays, books ot spiritual significance, — all 
these womd be acceptaoie. 

Arrangements have been made for sending on our package 
free of express charge. Any books left before the Easter vaca- 
tion at the English Literature Oilice, Room 20, College Hall, — 
where a book-case just within the door stands eager to receive 
them, — will be caremlly packed and forwarded. 

Remembering how liueraily the College responded to a similar 
appeal made, two years ago, for a colony ol consumptives, it is 
sate to express thanks in advance, but, by the grace of the Col- 
lege News editors, I hope to renew the thanks in a report of 
progress later on. Katharine Lee Bates. 

A NOTABLE ALUMNA. 



FREE PRESS. 



Miss Anna Foote Webb of the class of 1882 has achieved more 
than falls to the lot of most v\ el.esley graduates. She was an en- 
thusiastic student of history and becoming, during her senior 
year, deeply interested in Spain, she determined to learn the 
language and to make a first-hand study of the romantic land 
beyond the Pyrenees as soon as opportunity should offer. After 
several years of teaching there came in 1890 the chance to go to 
Spain. Miss Webb found a congenial home and the means for 
prosecuting her study of Spanish literature and history in the 
international Institute, then located at San Sebastian. Her 
interest in the school and its students there gathered, deepened 
until she determined to make this her life work. \\ ith the ex- 
ception of two winters spent with her parents in this country, 
Miss Webb has devoted the past fifteen years to this work, 
teaching History and Latin and growing wise as to the needs and 
capacities of Spanish girls. Her exceptional experience and de- 
votion rendered her manifestly the best person to take charge 
of the school after Mrs. Gulick's death. A year ago Miss Webb 
was appointed principal of the mission school conducted by the 
Woman's Board. During these difficult first years at Madrid, 
she has directed the work with untiring zeal, winning new friends 
and adherents for this endeavor to bring opportunity for a liberal 
education within reach of Spanish girls. 

AN OPPORTUNITY TO DO SETTLEMENT WORK. 

The head worker in the East Side House, New York City, has 
written to our College Christian Association for help in securing 
a resident helper for next year. This settlement is carried on by 
the Young Women's Christian Association, and its work promises 
so much opportunity that more workers are needed. The head 
resident desires a young woman who is thoroughly interested in 
this sort of work, — one who will be willing to give lour hours a 
day at least, to clubs and settlement classes and one who can 
pay her own board amounting to about five or six dollars a week. 

This is an exceptional opportunity for service and one that 
will appeal to the student of economic and Christian settlement 
problems. Further information may be had from the President 
of the Christian Association. 



Then.' will be a mass meeting of students Wednesday after- 
noon, at 4.15, March 22, in College Hall Chapel. Some of the 
Faculty will speak to enlist sympathy for the cause of the So- 
ciety of the Friends of Russian Freedom. 



I. 
There are many opportunities given us to prove our devotion 
to Wellesley; one may find constant chances to "answer to her 
every call." And to those of us who have been to Silver Bay 
there comes a new understanding of the possibilities in our 
Y\ ellesley delegation for representing our College in the midst 
of friendly Collegiate competition. 

Surely when Vassar and Smith, Mt. Holyoke and Bryn Mawr 
are sending each year to the Silver Bay conference their most at- 
tractive, best intellectually equipped, strongest student leaders, 
Vv ellesley longs too that she may not take a place of lower repre- 
sentation. Shall our College stand before that large gathering 
of three hundred preparatory school students, judged by an un- 
representative delegation? Shall we allow our place of preemn- 
nence among Eastern colleges to be undervalued by a gathering 
rep'esenting eighty-seven different schools and colleges? 

Surely when only fifty students can be sent from YV ellesley 
this year shall not the girls who are urged to go, feci that this is 
both an opportunity and an obligation given them by Weilesley 
herself? E. J. S. 

II. 

"Last week the class of gave a play called 'Freddie's Life' 

at the Barn. The excellency of the cast was only to be rivalled 
by the faithful work of the committee, etc. " 

* How often we read it. In our rooms, in the halls, at the Barn, 
we discuss the play freely and frankly, its iaults and its merits 
and do not hesitate to award praise or blame, but in the columns 
of the News, all work, good, bad, or indifferent, receives the same 
meed of enthusiastic, indiscriminate praise. The play may be 
saved from failure by the brilliant work of one girl but we learn 
that "the performance of Saturday evening was especially note- 
worthy for its even east." The hero may move with the ease 
and grace of a wooden image but "his interpretation of the part 
of Launcelot was charming." 

From Freshman year we are trained in criticism of everything, 
from "Sweetness and Light" to "King Lear" but, so far, no one 
in College seems able or willing to write a fair and intelligent 
criticism of a Barnswallow play. 



Miss Heniy and the Tennessee Mountaineers. 

Wednesday afternoon, at the Tau Zeta Epsilon House, Miss 
Margaret E. Henry, of Maryville College, Tennessee, spoke of 
the Settlement work that is being done among the Southern 
Mountaineers, and told something of the history of 'Walker's 
Valley" in the Smoke Mountains. There theee people have lived 
since their emigration from the colonies; which, they felt, were 
getting too worldly; in an isolation so complete that generation 
after generation has grown up with absolutely no communication 
with the outside world, no laws for the prevention of crime, no 
books or schools, and not the most ordinary conception of the 
amenities of life 

These conditions seem the most discouraging possible for the 
Settlement worker, but there is a corresponding encouragement 
in the fact that the mountaineers are descendants of the best 
Scotch-Irish stock of the colonies, and the children are not only 
eager to learn, but have keen and receptive minds, with the 
sturdy independence and pride of the mountain-born. It is 
significant that it was through their own efforts that the first 
school was started among these mountaineers of Walker's Val- 
lev. 

"Miss Hcnrv spoke with the simple convincing force and un- 
failing appeal of those who have given up their lives in devotion 
to a good cause, and as her talk was the real story of real people, 
presented in all its pathos, with a most delightful kindly humor 
to relieve the situation, everyone who heard her felt that it had 
been a lasting inspiration. 



LOST. 

A brown leather address book has been missing from 3 Nor- 
folk Terrace since the fire on February 27. This book contains 
many useful addresses and small papers of value only to the 
owner. 

Any information wdiich may lead to tracing this property will 

be very much appreciated by the owner. 

Adele Ogden, 

3 Norfolk Terrace, Wellesley, Mass. 



college news 



BAZAAR DES PROVINCES. 



For more than a week Wellesley curiosity has been aroused 
by the announcement of a French bazaar to be given at the 
Barn under the supervision of L'Alliance Francaise. Monday 
afternoon, from three to six, found a miniature French colony 
there, prepared to amuse you as well as provide for your wants. 

The Barn was more than usually attractive. Instead of a 
midway lined with booths, there was an oblong of small 
shops, surrounded by broad avenues, and filled with the 
most persistent, attractive, Frenchy venders of wares who had 
little mercy for the dilettante who played around and tried to 
talk French, and still less for the ignorant who spoke only Eng- 
lish and German. 

The first and most enticing booth was filled with flowers and 
flower girls who, while they held a pink carnation against you 
for a background, beguiled you with these words. "Elle est 
tres belle mademoiselle, tres belle, et la couleur s'accorde avec 
vos jottes." 

" Mais, je n'ai pas de monnaie, " you would respond 

"N'importe, mademoiselle, vous pouvez, demain. Et cette 
fleur, elle est charmante, tres charmante. " 

And so it went around the square, where you wandered on, 
assisted if necessary, by Cook's facetious French guides. Madame, 
la necromancien had an outside agent to persuade you to enter, 
and if enter you did, you might count on a most respectable for- 
tune cleverly told Next to the fortune teller's was the roulette 
table which was as honest as one could desire. You were sure to 
get something if only a baby German stein. Then there was 
a counter covered with feminine creations and necessities, col- 
lars, cuffs, handkerchiefs, bags and needle cases, all very 
pretty. 

The booth where you threw at little darky dolls for chocolate 
cigars was popular with Cook's guides, and lairly so with Cook's 
tourists. The candy counter adjoining was covered with the 
most tempting array of fudge, chocolate peppermints, and nut 
candies. 

The Barn stage made a charming cafe, where you sat with a 
friend at a small round table, and were served by a dainty French 
maid while you looked down at the gay crowd below. Occa- 
sionally, a company of dancing girls in short pink skirts and little 
green bodices, fluttered out, attracting much attention. Just 
around the corner was a heavily curtained room, containing an 
interesting collection of Mrs. Jarley's French wax works. 

Everywhere was the sound of gay French chatter, and the 
whole scene was one of French gaiety. C. B. Singleton. 



LETTER FROM DR. HUME. 



An article a few weeks ago in this paper told of the need of 
a sterilizing apparatus for Dr. Ruth Hume's hospital in Ah- 
mednagar. It is a great pleasure to be able to announce now 
that this need has been met by the gift of a Wellesley alumna, 
a member of Dr. Bissell's class, and her family. 

May I call your attention now to this extract from one of 
Dr. Hume's letters describing another need and ask if there 
is any suggestion as to how the sum of $3,000 might begin to be 
raised to provide this new house of which she speaks? 

EXTRACTS FROM RECENT LETTERS FROM DR. RUTH P. HUME RE- 
GARDING THE NEED OF A RESIDENCE IN CONNECTION WITH 
THE NEW HOSPITAL IN AHMEDNAGAR, INDIA. 

Last night I was up until 3 A.M. The night before also I 
had to get up and go over to the Hospital. Oh, for a house 
near the Hospital. It would save us a vast amount of time 
and strength. 

Yesterday a Parsee lady came and has a private room I 
have heard that word is being sent to all the Parsees in this 
section, even as far as Bombay, to come here when they are 
sick. 

It does seem as if we must have a house right near the Hospi- 
tal. It wastes our time and strength to have to go over there 
so far. Often a message is brought to me in the middle of the 
day or night that some one is not well. Then I simply have to 
use my best judgment whether to send directions or whether 
to go over myself. Miss Campbell (the chief nurse) says she 
has reached the point of not expecting to come here to the 
house without hearing of some pressing need to go back to the 
Hospital. 

It is amazing to see how eager women are to come to the 
Hospital. They fall at my feet and beg to be taken in. Dr. 
Bissell did a splendid work here and I am reaping the benefit 
of it." E. H. Kendrick. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



The regular formal meeting of the Agora was held in the 
Agora House, Wednesday evening, March the eighth. 

Informal speeches: 

The situation in San Domingo Miss Brown and Miss More 

Recent proceedings in the Senate . . Miss Camp and Miss Moore 

Formal program : 
A meeting of the Continental Congress to discuss the organiza- 
tion of the army, and the appointment of George Washing- 
ton as Commander-in-Chief. Speakers : 

Helen Dustin William Sherman 

Grace Herrick John Adams 

Agnes Wood Patrick Henry 

Marion Bosworth George Washington 



At a program meeting of the Shakespeare Society, held in the 
Shakespeare House, on Monday evening, March 13, the follow- 
ing girls were formally received into membership: Elizabeth 
J. Moore, 1906, Sadie M. Samuel, 1906, Helen S. Knowles, 1907. 
The former members present were, Mrs. Rothery and Mrs. Fuller. 



At a regular meeting of the Phi Sigma Fraternity held Wednes- 
day, March 8, the following program was presented: 

Outline of the "Divine Comedy" Amy Gurlitz 

Dante's Conception of Sin and its Punishment Maria Dowd 

Dante's Philosophy in the Divine Comedy. . . .Ethel Sturtevant 
Dante in Relation to the Middle Ages and to the Renaissance, 

Claire Sampson 



Board for the 

EASTER VACATION 



— AT— 



The Wellesley Inn* 



FORSYTHE'S 

SUITS 

WALKING SUITS 

DRESS SUITS 

EVENING DRESESS 
DRESS SKIRTS 

WALKING SKIRTS 

EVENING WRAPS 
COATS, JACKETS 

TOURING COATS 

RAIN COATS 



"Waists 



of every description and for all occasions; for street 
wear, house wear, dress, theatre, travelling, etc. 

Everything new and fresh — no old goods — all 
garments marked in plain figures. 

JOHN FORSYTHE 

THE WAIST HOUSE 
865 Broadway, 17th and 18th Streets. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ORTHIC SHORTHAND SOCIETY, 

398 Boylston Street, Boston. 

Orthographic Cursive "Orthic"' Shorthand by H. L. Callendar, 
M.A.. L.L.D., F.U.S., England. Rapid courses of instruction ( oO 
days ) especially adapted to professional and literal y work. Classes 
held at So.'iety or at Clubs, etc., also private instruction. Special 
rates Wellesley. Inquiry invited. Tel. Hack Bay 2819-1. 



]owKE.ys 



CHOCOLATES 



SOc and 60c per lt>. 

DELICIOUS -DAINTY— PURE. 
416 Washington St., (4th door North of Summer St.) 



THOMPSON & CHRISTIE, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Xaoies' Gymnasium 
ano JBatbino Suits, 

91 BLEEKER STREET, 
Short block west of Broadway. 

Telephone Connection 117-4 

F. E. VETTER, 

PLOR1ST. 

Prompt Attention Given all orders. 

"BQelleslCB Square 
M. G. SHAW, 

Watchmaker 
and Optician, 

P. O. Box 283. Wellesley, Mass. 

Hot Chocolate 

with Whipped Cream — the entirely 
different kind — served at our fountain 
for 5C. 

Coffee, Beef Tea, Asparox, Malted 
Milk, Ginger, Tomato, Clam Bouillon 
— all served hot in porcelain mugs, 5c. 

Sexton's Pharmacy, 



John A. Morgan X Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 



Established 1844. 
J. P. L»wrence G. A. M»nn A. A. Tapley 

H.L.LAWRENCE CO 

SUCCESSORS TO 

H. L. LAWRENCE & CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Poultry and Wild Game. 

Hotels, Steamships, Restaurants and 
Family Trade a Specialty. 

STALLS 46 &. 43 

Faneuil Hall Market, Boston 

CONNECTED BT TELEPnON*. 




A RT NOT ES. 

It isdesirable^that^every^one^should take^advantage of the 
opportunity to see the collectiorToi Monet picturesnow open at 
Copley Hail. Monet, perhaps more than any other living man, 
has influenced the art of our day, and though his aims were not 
understood at first, he has long since been accepted as one who 
sees beauty, and expresses it in a logical and scientific fashion. 

He is not to be reproached for what he does not do, but ad- 
mired for the accomplishment of what to him is the best worth 
doing. 

He is essentially modern; giving us modern thought in a lan- 
guage that is the most natural mode of expression. He has 
broken many traditions, but has established a new one to be in 
its turn discarded or modified when the time and the man comes. 

Perhaps the greatest lesson we can learn from him is that art 
is not imitative, but seeks to express a thought or a feeling in 
terms of nature. 

Charles H. Woodbury, 

Department of Art, Wellesley College. 

BLASHFIELD EXHIBITION, ART BUILDING. 

The Art Department has been fortunate in securing the draw- 
ings and studies, many of them in color, by Mr. Edwin H. Blash- 
fieid, which were recently on exhibition at the St. Botolph Club 
in Boston. 

Mr. Blashfield ranks among the two or three leading artists 
in America in interior decoration. His sense of decorative val- 
ues and his power of adapting painting to its surroundings is 
unsurpassed. One of his best known decorations is the great 
work on the interior of the dome of the Congressional Library at 
Washington, and another is the decoration of the State House of 
Minnesota. 

Mr. Blashfield is known as a critic as well as an artist. His 
book on "Italian Cities," written in collaboration with Mrs. 
Blashfield, is a valuable contribution to the qualitative side of 
art appreciation. 

The exhibition is held in the Art Gallery 7 of the Art Building, 
and will remain open until the end of the term. 

The paintings of which these drawings are the original studies 
are to be seen only when in position. Mr. Blashfield rarely ex- 
hibits paintings outside of the buildings for which they are 
designed. In fact the finishing work is largely done when the 
pictures are in place. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



A business meeting of the Christian Association was held in 
College Hall Chapel, Thursday evening, March 16th. Three new 
names were proposed, and the recommendations accepted by 
the Association. Miss Kendrick gave a report for the Mission- 
ary Committee on the money that has been raised this year. 
The pledges have amounted to Si, 439. 54 of which $788.82 has 
already been paid. This represents 720 givers or 70 per cent, 
of the College with an average of $2 per member. $750 has been 
paid for our College Missionary, Dr. Hume, and the remainder 
has been expended in various ways, as, for instance, helping Miss 
Johnson in her work for girls in Egypt or supporting an orphan 
in India. Miss Cook made but a partial report for the committee 
to suggest candidates for next year's secretary. No name was 
definitely proposed. A request was read by the President from 
the East Side New York Settlement House, asking for a possible 
worker for the coming year, all applications to be made through 
Miss Emerson. The meeting adjourned. 



NOTE! 



Wellesley Students will find 

Wright & Ditson's Store, 

344 Washington Street, Boston, 

^^A/y»iAj An ideal place to purchase Athletic Supplies. They have the 
best and latest goods for each pastime: FIELD HOCKEY, 
TENNIS. GOLF, BASKET BALL, FENCING. SKATES. 
SKATING and GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

Wright & Ditson are getting out a catalogue exclusively for 
ladies' which will be sent free to any address 



Jiigh Class Millinery, 

168 Tremont Street, 



Boston, flDass. 



Discount to Wellesley and Dana Hall 
Students and Faculty. 



DENTIST, 

Dr. Edward E. Henry, 

Gagior's JSSlocft, Wellesley 

Telephone 113- Wellesley. 
R. H. PORTER, 

Hardware Store 

Just received new lot Kitchen 
Ware, including good assortment 
of Aluminum Ware. 

Typewriting done at this office 

Taylor's Block. 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers In 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

Qassicis (T\. \\a\\, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS 

Connected by Telephone. 

STURTEVANT & HALEY 

BEER AIND 
SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 
Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON. 

Telephone 033 Richmond. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 



(In addition to items about Alumnse, this column will occa- 
sionally contain notes about members of the Faculty, past and 
present, and former students.) 

Miss Scudder's hymn will be found in the Churchman instead 
of in the Outlook as stated last week. The poems recently re- 
ferred to in this column and some shorter poems by Professor 
Katharine Lee Bates, 1880, will be published in the April and 
May numbers of the Magazine. It has been understood that 
Alumna" often confine their reading to the Alumnae column, and 
as these poems are of especial interest to them and have been 
called to the attention of the Alumna? editor, they will be in- 
serted there, although they are of general interest. 

The following addresses have been received: 

Mrs. Alice Schouler Miller, 1896, 184 Commonwealth avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Miss Henrietta Hardy, 1890, 29 Bartlett avenue, Arlington, 
Massachusetts. 

Miss Bertha L. Hawes, 1886-1890, 81 West street, North- 
ampton, Massachusetts. 

Miss Mary Carolyn Smith, 1901, 187 Monroe Street, Roxbury, 
Massachusetts. 

Miss Edith Stearns, 1904. 755 Piedmont avenue, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

The Alurnnae luncheon of the Chicago Wellesley Club was held 
Saturday, March nth, in the rooms of the Chicago Woman's 
Club, in'honor of President Hazard and Miss Olive Davis, 1886. 
\ ) >.it fifty Alumne and former students were present and an 
informal reception to the guests of honor preceded the serving of 
the luncheon. The president of the Club. Mrs. Florence Run- 
nells Bryant, 1883, introduced President Hazard, who spoke 
most interestingly of the present conditions at Wellesley and of 
plans for the future. In closing, the Phi Beta Kappa poem, 
written for the installation of the chapter at Wellesley. was read 
by Miss Hazard. The occasion served to promote the loyalty 
of all the Wellesley girls present and was a most delightful re- 
newing of college ties. 

The last two books of the series for United Study of the Mis- 
sionary Societies are to be written by Wellesley graduates, Mrs. 
Helen Barrett Montgomery, 1884. and Mrs. Anna Robertson 
Brown Lindsay, 1883. The title of Mrs. Montgomery's book 
is "The Island World;" that of Mrs. Lindsay's, "Foreign Mis- 
sions and Social Progress." 

Mrs. Alice Ames Winter, 1886, has just published a novel. 
"The Prize to the Hardy," dealing with life in Minneapolis and 
the Northwest. The illustrations are by her brother-in-law, Mr. 
Raymond Crosby, whose work in Life and other magazines has 
made him alreadv well-known. 

Miss Harriet Towne, 1889- 189 1, is teaching history at Bur- 
lington. Vermont. Her address is 100 North Willard street. 

Miss Frances L. Libbv, 1893, ' s taking a vacation this winter, 
but returns to her position at Bridgton, Maine, in the spring, to 
complete the year there. 

Miss Antoinette Bigelow, 1893, is to be in Springfield the last of 
May. It will be remembered that Miss Bigelow left her position 
in the Springfield High School at the end of last year to accept 
the principalship of a school among the mountain people at 
Hindman, Kentucky. Miss Petit, who is in charge of the Settle- 
ment House there writes of the wonderful work Miss Bigelow 
has done already for the school. 

Miss Grace Godfrey. 1896, has charge of the buying, menus, 
house-servants, etc., of the Lake Placid Club in the Adirondacks, 
which accommodates three hundred guests in summer. 

Miss Helen Greenwood, 1896. is teaching in the Biology De- 
partment of the Worcester English High School. Last year in 
addition to teaching, she did a year's graduate work at Welles- 
ley and received the Wellesley Scholarship from the Botanical 
Department at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Wood's Hole. 

Miss Mary Hefferan, 1896, is Research Assistant in the De- 
partment of Bacteriology in the University of Chicago. Her 
latest publication is "Bionomics of Anopheles" by E. O. Jordan 
and Mary Hefferan in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, Janu- 
ary. 1905. 

Miss Evangeline Kendall, 1896, is with the Presbyterian Board 
of Publication as managing editor of "Forward" and writing 
a little for publication. 

Miss Pauline McDowell, 1896, is studying Chemistry at Col- 
umbia University. 

Miss Mary Montgomery, 1896, is working with the Encyclo- 
pedia Brittanica Company on the Historian's History of the 
World, and is also writing articles on Arabic subjects for the Jew- 
ish Encyclopedia. 

Miss Isabelle Moore, 1896, is in Daytona. Florida, tutoring a 
boy and girl who are preparing for College. 

Mrs. Cordelia Nevers Marriott. 1S96, was in Holland with 
Captain Marriott and her small daughter this summer. Miss 
Edith Butler, 1896, visited Mrs. Marriott when she was in Eng- 
land. 



G F. fiovey & Co. 

Are Showing a 
Large and Attractive Stock of New 

Foreign and Domestic 
Wash Fabrics 

For the Coming 
Spring Season 

Samples sent on request. 

RONTON • 33 SUMMER STREET, 
*-»v^«J A KJ I y . 43 A V0N STREET. 




Fruits and Vegetables. 

Hot-House Products and Canned Goods. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN HOTEL, CLUB 
AND FAMILY ORDERS. 

ISAAC LOCKE, (SL CO., 

97, 99 a»d IOI Faneuil Hall Market, Boston 






=8 IS 

■ 

KB 



O 

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UJ 

a. 
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P or m toe ttOORES "^ 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNAE NOTES— Continued. 



Miss Abbie Paige, 1896, is Treasurer of the Boston College 
Club. 

Mrs. Marie Ryder Sylvester, 1896, is the second reader of the 
Christian Science Church of Worcester. She has two children, 
a boy eight years old, and a girl three. 

Dr. Carlotta Swett, 1896, is giving some lectures in Brookline 
this winter. She is practicing in Bangor, Maine. 

Miss Mary Townsend, 1896, has been engaged in work at the 
newly organized Y. W. C. A. in Trenton, New Jersey, this year. 

Dr. Mabel Wells, 1896, is taking patients to North Carolina 
for the "rest cure." 

Miss Edith Whitlock, 1896, is Superintendent of Dr. King's 
private hospital in Portland, Maine. 

Miss Lydia Wilkins, 1896, is teaching English at the "Plaza" 
in Ponce, Porto Rico 

Miss Clara Willis, 1896, is teaching Kindergarten at Newton 
Centre. 

Miss Annie Witherle, 1896, is teaching in the High School at 
Rumford, Maine. 

Miss Nellie L. Fowler, 1S98, is teaching college preparatory 
English and English History at Miss Mittelberger's School for 
Girls in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Miss Grace M. Chanin, 1898, is head of the English Depart- 
ment in a school in Monroe, Michigan, and also has had charge 
of the boys' session room. Her address is 360 Washington 
street. 

Miss Lucv B. Proctor, 1903, is teaching in the High School 
at Revere, Massachusetts. Her subjects are German, Algebra. 
Trigonometry. Astronomy and Geology. 

Miss Elsie D. Newton, 1903, has been doing graduate work 
in philosophy and psychology in the University of Cincinnati, 
and also some tutoring in Mathematics. 

Miss Virginia Hoge, 1003-1904, has been spending the winter 
in Florence, Italv. studying vocal music with Vannucini. 

Mis« Maude Burroughs, 1899, has charge of the stenography 
and typewriting in Gloucester High School. Her address is 
10 Riggs street. 

Miss Rebecca D Moore, 1899, is teaching French and History 
in Ihe Saugus High School, Mass. 

Miss Alice Kecrers Le Pov, 1900. is living in Duluth, Minn. 
After graduating she studied Domestic Science at Pratt Institute,) 
New York, and taught that subject at Y. W. C. A. in Duluth.; 
Her address is 122 Twelfth avenue. 

Miss Florence E. Prilcy. igco. l£vj?ht in Grrdrcr last year 
after her return frcm Furcre and is now teaching French andi 
German in Ardcver, Mass. 

Miss Matel Croll, 1001. is teaching Botany in the High School, 
at Burlingtcn. New Jersey. _ . 

Miss Katharine Hotz, 1902. is teaching English and Latin in 
the High School at Garrett, Indiana. 

Miss Annie B. McClure, 1004, will he in California during the 
last of March and the month of April. 

Miss Ruth Crosby, 1902. is teaching in "The Children's Priv- 
ate School" in Fitchl urg three hcurs a week. 

Miss Cora M. Adams, 1903, is teaching in New Britain, Conn.' 
Her address is 95 Maple street. 

Miss Angie S. Kuhl, 190-?, has rrivate pupils in piano this year. 

FIRTES. 
At Grafton, Massachusetts, December 8, 1904, a daughter, 
Barbara Briggs, to Mrs. Jennie Briegs Leavens, 1895. 

DEATHS. 
In Plymouth, Massachusetts, March 8, 1905, John Langford, 
father of Grace Langford, Instructor in Physics. 



THEATER NOTES. 



Hollis-street Theater — Maxine Ellictt in "Her OwnWay ", 

Park Theater — Charles Hawtrey in "A Message frcm Mars." 

Majestic Theater — "The Filibuster." 

Colonial Theater — "Humpty Dumpty." 

Tremoxt Theater — "The Cingalee. " 

Castle Square Theater — "Romeo and Juliet." 



HERRICK'S, 

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English Kit Bags and Travelling Requisites. 

London Hand Sewn Gloves 

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